The Museum of Printing is dedicated to preserving the history of the graphic arts, printing equipment and printing craftsmanship. read more >

Ask not what your Museum can do for you (just see below)

What’s Going on at the Museum

  • Three Letterpress Sales in 2018

    Salvaged Presses Being Restored

    Our intrepid volunteers saved two Golding Pearls from the wrecking ball and a Prouty from the junkyard. Mark your calendars for our 2018 Letterpress Sales on April 7th, July 28th, and November 17th when these cleaned-up presses will be coming to market. And stop by our Gift Shop any Saturday, 10–4, where we have lots of type and letterpress goodies for sale.

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  • The Museum of Printing in the Movies

    “At the end of 2016, we got a call from the 20th Century Fox property department in regards to a movie about newspaper printing in 1971,” MoP President Frank Romano said. “At that time (1971) they were still using a Linotype machine to set a line of type in metal.”

    Frank Romano displays an historic front page from The Washington Post

    The Museum of Printing had just what was needed to depict the composing rooms of 1971.

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  • 2018 Calendar

    March

    Sat. 24
    Hot Metal Day – Warm up with Hot Metal Emojis
    Sat. 31
    Book Sale

    April

    Sat. 7
    Letterpress Sale
    Sat. 14
    Letterpress Workshop – Elementary Makeready
    Sat. 21
    Lecture by David R. Godine, Publisher, “A Life in Brief Chapters,” 1:00 – 2:30 p.m. with a small reception to follow, free admission, limited seating – RSVP to Enable JavaScript to view protected content

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  • Anna Hogan: A Life Etched in Art

    The Museum of Printing is sad to note the passing of Anna Hogan, esteemed wood engraver and friend, who died peacefully on December 17th just a few weeks after her 96th birthday. A local artist, Anna gained national recognition through the Wood Engravers’ Network and our museum.

    Our art gallery showcases a permanent display of Anna’s work. Her talent and skill awe visitors. It was almost a decade ago when she walked through our front door with armloads of engravings, having generously decided to donate her life’s work to the Museum. We are honored to hold this important collection and showcase it for all to enjoy.

    Anna Hogan wood engraving, titled "From the Lookout" on this print, "View from the Highway" on her block

    Anna’s art reflects her many interests. When she wasn’t teaching art at Stratford High School in Connecticut, she enjoyed traveling the New England countryside and the world, from Japan to Mexico. Every December, she created a new holiday card for family and friends. In the summer of 2013, she participated in the Wood Engravers’ Network weeklong Workshop at the Museum of Printing where she reconnected with old friends and made many new ones. In the autumn of 2013 WEN organizer, Jim Horton, wrote in Block & Burin “One of the best parts of the museum was an exhibition of Anna Hogan. Anna is a famed printmaker, now in her nineties, who lives in Andover. She actually attended the Workshop, called herself a student, and yet she could teach us all. As many WEN members know, her prints are precious jewels . . . as is she. A warm, sincere person and absolutely on top of everything.”

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  • Tour the Museum with Frank

    A very quick view of the great stuff you’ll find at the Museum. Put your running shoes on!

    Frank Romano tours the Museum

    [ click! ]


  • George Phineas Gordon’s Platen Job Press

    Until 1880, inventors had to submit models along with their patent applications to the United States Patent and Trademark Office. Some models were crudely made but others, like this wooden press, were fine and exacting replicas. Known as the father of the platen press, George Phineas Gordon received his first patent in 1850 and submitted over 50 more in his lifetime. This particular patent, No. 148,050, implemented improvements in the operation of the platen, grippers and ink distribution. Gordon’s platen, or job, press was one of the first truly American contributions to printing technology.

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  • The Museum of Printing Type Libraries

    Our collection of Mergenthaler Linotype drawings consists of 3,193 black boxes, specially made for storing the drawings. Each box has 100 to 140 sheets, one for each glyph. Each sheet is numbered and there is a summary sheet indicating what glyphs are enclosed. When we received the collection from the Smithsonian 20 years ago, we inventoried every box and prepared a spreadsheet with information on each box. In many cases, the source of the fonts is indicated.

    From 1920 to 1960 the Linotype library dominated typeface use. There were fewer than 100 US Monotype services and only ATF and Ludlow had unique fonts, mostly for display. Then came Photon, Compugraphic, GSI, Wang, Varityper, Alphatype, Autologic, Triple-I, and many others. They all needed type libraries and stole freely from Linotype. There is no law against this.

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  • Happy 100th Birthday, Gudrun Zapf von Hesse

    Gudrun Zapf von Hesse’s titling font, created 70 years ago as stamps for lettering on leather book covers and spines, is released as a digital font on her hundredth birthday.

    Read Ferdinand Ulrich’s article on a remarkable graphic artist >

    Read more >


Mass. Cultural CouncilPrograms are supported in part by grants from the Haverhill, Georgetown, Merrimac, Boxford and West Newbury Cultural Councils, local agencies which are supported by the Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state agency.

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Print Connections by Richard Romano
Essays on History, Technology, and the Graphic Arts
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