The Museum of Printing is dedicated to preserving the history of the graphic arts, printing equipment and printing craftsmanship. read more >

LETTERPRESS EXAMPLES WANTED! Read more >

News and Events

  • Museum of Printing Long-Time Board Member Louis Rosenblum Passes

    Lou RosenblumLouis ‘Lou’ Rosenblum died peacefully at his home in Belmont, Massachusetts on September 22, 2016. He was born in New York City in 1921 to Isadore and Bessie Rosenblum. The middle of three children, he graduated from Yonkers High School and matriculated at MIT in 1938 where he majored in Applied Math. At MIT he had the good fortune to study under Professor Harold ‘Doc’ Edgerton on photography and strobe lights. ‘Doc’ worked at the intersection of engineering and art, and projects combining engineering and art became the motif of Lou’s career.

    Lou graduated MIT in 1942 and joined Polaroid to work on war-related engineering projects. Later his Polaroid career included development of Edwin Land’s iconic invention of instant photography. In 1954, he moved to Photon where he worked on early photocomposition systems, the first of many leading-edge printing-related projects that occupied the next forty years. It was during this time he first became interested in the challenges of typesetting non-Latin-based languages such as Chinese, Russian, Arabic, and Hindi.

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  • Letterpress Examples Wanted!

    Wanted! Letterpress ExamplesThe Museum of Printing in Haverhill, MA is expanding our library of works by amateur letterpress printers — publications, printed pieces, examples, samples and photographs of older printing establishments and private presses. Our new location provides us with secure, environmentally friendly storage.

    We know we need publications and information by APA, APHA, ATF, AAPA, NAPA, Treasure Gems, It’s a Small World, Guy Botterill, Type and Press, The Printer Newspaper. We have examples of some of these but are trying to complete our collections. What have we missed? We do not know, so please bring us up-to-date with information on, by or about other letterpress and type organizations. We’re also interested in examples of embossing, debossing, thermography, die-cutting, etc.

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  • Matthew Carter gave the 2016 Lieberman lecture: “Genuine imitations: a type designer’s view of revivals”

    Matthew CarterThe American Printing History Association (APHA) and Museum of Printing will present a free lecture by famed type designer Mathew Carter, “Genuine Imitations: A Type Designer’s View of Revivals,” at the Museum of Printing, Saturday, December 3 at 2:00 p.m. | View and download a flyer >

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  • The Inland Printer

    The most current, up-to-date printing technology — 132 years ago.

    The Inland Printer was the longest published printing magazine in the United States. First published in October 1884 and still published on a limited basis “It may have been the first magazine to use a different cover illustration on every issue,” according to MagazineArt.org.

    See the industry in all its letterpress glory in the complete second edition from November 1884 here (view or download pdf, 14.9 MB).

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  • New font technology on the horizon

    Imagine a single font file gaining an infinite flexibility of weight, width, and other attributes without also gaining file size — and imagine what this means for design.

    Read more on the Adobe Typekit Blog >

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  • Anatomy of ATF Type

    What is a Type Foundry? A company that makes type.

    Metal type diagram

    One of the foremost in the US was American Type Foundries (ATF), founded in 1892 when 23 independent type foundries consolidated. These foundries were brought together for several reasons, one being that the Linotype, which produced a line of type, was introduced a few years earlier and was cutting into the sales of hand set type. Another was that the type produced by the various foundries was not systematic — point sizes and baselines varied between companies.

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Mass. Cultural CouncilThe Museum of Printing is supported in part by grants from Boxford, Georgetown, Groveland, Haverhill & Merrimack Cultural Councils, local agencies which are supported by the Massachusetts Cultural Council, a State Agency.

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